Saturday, 31 August 2013

2 Separate Rule-Books



First a little experience to be shared.

Here I was with my weekly vegetables in a bag, standing in the queue of the supermarket cash counter, and there was my better half taking the little one for on-demand push-cart spins. I thought gleefully how, as usual, I had chosen the less strenuous task of the day, when a big belly of a 40-something pushed its way in front of where my belly, if I had one, should have been. I would have pinched him into his rightful place, but for his 12-something son by his side who was nearly my height and weight and seemed like a loyal one who would come to fisticuffs in order to “protect” his daddy from a wild looking woman’s attack. (Their similar mohawks almost suggested a cult!) So, I acted prim and asked him to get in the queue, and certainly behind me.

This is a queue only, na!” he answered with a smattering of that accent my community loves to use at high decibels. “Sure is, but your place is behind me, not in front of me" I mustered.

To read more, please click here.



19 comments:

  1. This happens with a lot of us... even on the roads when a car swerves and breaks all the rules, you gnash your teeth and also notice that he has a religious mantra or symbol 'sticker-ed' on his rear windshield... so much for spirituality!

    Arvind Passey
    www.passey.info

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    1. Oh, so you have noticed that too? I tell you, it's appalling, this coincidence. Maybe this is what Faith in His kripa is all about, Arvind:) Thanks for stopping by! :)

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  2. “The point is that your son is watching you misbehave with me right now!”
    There was silence. The match was over. Someone asked him to get back in line.
    Well done with Mr. Queue-breaker, Sakshi. I, myself have been dealing with 'such pain in the neck - no - civic sense' types in public view many - a - times and my daughter learnt how to deal with such people, straight in the face. I'm sure Nishad would've looked up to you too.
    Great work with the rule - abiding as well as with the thought - provoking write-up. :D

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    1. Thanks Stir YourSouls. Glad we are on the same page. They are indeed a pain in the nether-regions these goondas in plain clothes, no matter what justification they have for their ill-manners. I wanted to adopt that rogue's kid away from him.

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  3. You will pay for THAT, Sakshi, oh how you will pay :) Yucky Veg Khichdi for the Prince and yummy instant noodles for you? Comes the day of retribution, you will reap what you just sowed :)

    Two rule books? Not at all - you just teach the child that you need to give lip service to some things and do exactly what you please :)

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    1. :D I make yummy veg. khichdi, you know! :) 'Day of Retribution' sounds scary, almost like another of Hollywood's America-saved-the-world films starring Arnold. :P Thanks for reading, Suresh! :D

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  4. The super market situation well handled, sometimes I am at loss for words in such situations, now I will remember this... but instant noodles? How could you?! :)

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    1. I know, Indrani. Strange bit is, I would gladly repeat the instant noodles and without a pang of guilt. Am I a bad mom? :P Thanks for stopping by! :)

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  5. I hate to say this but why are a majority of queue breakers women? And educated ones! Perhaps culture, civic sense and patience have little to do with education.

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    1. I totally second that, Alka. If I think which one I cannot stand more, it's women line breakers over men. Culture, civic sense and patience have VERY little to do with education!

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  6. Oh dear! Absolutely true. I always maintain, "Practice what you preach!"

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  7. That is so true Sakshi! We ss elders fail many a times to set yhe right example for our children. Some of which I have been sharing in my posts as well. And kids, they look small, but their thinking and thoughtfulness is way beyond our comprehension. We, at least I, definitely have to make amendments in my behaviour in certain situations.

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    1. Thanks for being on the same page, Rekha. And for admitting that we as adults do take liberties even as we curb our children's. It's really not asking for a big thing by keeping contradictions and confusions away from their minds till they can reason for themselves!

      (PS - We should meet. I have a feeling we will hit-it-off instantly!)

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  8. I love the way you write! How true your post is about breaking lines. I always ask such people " Jab hum maut ke queue me hai, to kya aap ghus ke mere pehle jayenge?" I can't tell you how I enjoy watching their jaws drop!
    This is my Bambaiya Hindi so please pardon the syntax and grammar.

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    1. Thank you, bellybytes. Good to see you around, and I know the deactivation of Google+ comments has a big hand in that. :)

      Now now, that is some quote you have left me with. I shall, with your permission, be using it every time someone disrespects the queue I am standing in. Those jaws dropping will be some sight! Will certainly tell you all about it when I use it too. :)

      Thank you for stopping by. SO happy!

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  9. I read this post a couple of days ago but was not able to type a response from my mobile. Sorry for the delay!
    Actually, I am kind of perturbed that the two rule-books that have happily (or unfortunately) coexisted for so long in our society may slowly be condensing into a single one - and that, sadly, looks very much like the one the parents follow. I can't even begin to tell you how many instances I see these days where the parents lazily (willfully?) ignore transgressions of their children.
    I am not a parent so it is easy for me to pass judgment, I guess, but I am quite concerned at the direction parenting is headed.

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    1. "and that, sadly, looks very much like the one the parents follow." - Especially sad if the parent is the one I met in the super mart. :)

      I see all those instances of will-full ignoring of transgressions, Rickie. ALL the time! No one parent can judge the other's parenting methods. But one can pass a comment on the person's/parent's behaviour. Basic civility is called 'basic' for a reason. And it is quite endangered.

      Parenting is heading in a multitude of directions. And usually following the neighbour's tail. Your concern is mine too!

      Thanks for reading, and commenting, knowing you do not like Parenting articles. A non-parent's views are quite welcome, actually :)

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